Programme

Programme
Day One

Day One

Monday 14 September 2020

Day Two

Day Two

Tuesday 15 September 2020

Social

Social

Social Progamme 2020

Critical Care Nursing comes to Nottingham

Nottinghamshire, or more specifically Derby is the birthplace of Florence Nightingale 200 years ago this year and we have her to thank for inventing the concept of intensive care, whereby reducing the death rate for injured and sickened soldiers by more than order of magnitude. During the Crimean War, in the 1850’s she demanded that the most seriously ill patients were placed in beds near to the nursing station so that they could be watched more closely, creating an early focus on the importance of a separate geographical area for critically ill patients. The uniqueness of her discovery resided in four formidable pillars of successful healthcare: organization, prioritization, teamwork and consistency. It was probably the most revolutionary change for the practice of what we since call “modern medicine”.

Nurses and midwives are critical in the delivery of modern healthcare services and are core in strengthening healthcare system. Acting both as individuals and as members and coordinators of interprofessional teams, nurses and midwives bring people-centred care closer to the communities where they are needed most, thereby helping improve health outcomes and the overall cost-effectiveness of services.  We provide a wide range of services in hospital settings, from accident and emergency through to palliative care. And as key players in crisis and post-crisis situations, we also contribute to the risk communication, response planning and multisectoral participation aspects of emergency preparedness programmes; alongside providing services ranging from trauma management to mental health and rehabilitation in post-critical care recovery.

Although many of us still head to work in scrubs and comfortable shoes, for many, the day to day reality of our job has changed in dramatic ways over the past decade.  We’ve gone from switchboards to smartphones and diplomas to degrees.  We’ve become highly specialized and serve as both the backbone of the healthcare system and on the front lines of developing health care solutions. Critical care is one of the fastest-growing hospital specialties and, looking back, it is clear just how far we have come in such a relatively short period of time, but we still have some distance to cover as we strive to ensure that critical care nursing provides effective, efficient, evidence-based care to all who need it.  

Modern day nurses constitute over 50% of the healthcare workforce yet we continue to struggle with issues such as professional recognition, barebones staffing ratios and rationalised education budgets alongside trying to maintain overall patient safety.  With all of this in mind the focus of this our 35th BACCN annual conference is: “Critical Care Nursing: the next decade” with many of the sessions focussing on preparing our nursing workforce to work within an increasingly digital workplace, whilst maintaining the essence of nursing. We’ll also explore current nursing theory and ask if it is fit for the next generation.

To tie in with the global “NursingNow” campaign, part of our focus for 2020 will be discussions on how we can raise the profile of nursing; empowering you all to become a stronger voice within the 21st century. Our hope is that you will leave the conference feeling proud and energised to be a critical care nurse – mastering your own profession and celebrating your contributions.

 

Programme coming soon... 

In the meantime, take a look at our social pages to find out what happens at Conference.